The No-Growth Fantasy

Venez parler ici de l'actualité étrangère et européenne
Répondre
Libéral

Message non lu par Libéral » 02 avr. 2010, 04:29:00

Un excellent article sur la position de l'Europe et plus particulièrement de la France sarkozyste en matière de politique et d'environnement. Comme quoi, nos politiques dans des buts uniquement électoralistes court-termistes nous mênent au déclin économique en jouant sur la stupidité gaucho-écologiste.

 :arrow: Article original en anglais
Take the worst economic crisis in 60 years. Combine it with the erosion of the West's predominance. Add apocalyptic warnings of climate change. What you'll get are some radical new ideas.

One of those now swirling through the European zeitgeist turns out to be a very old one, albeit in new garb. It's the revival of the assertion that economic development is and should be finite—limited today by scarce resources, overpopulation, and rising sea levels.
In Britain, a government commission has drawn up plans for a "steady state economy" that forgoes future economic growth in the name of sustainability by cutting work hours and banning TV commercials (to reduce consumerism). In Germany, new bestseller called Exit: Prosperity Without Growth is just the latest in a growing body of literature pleading for Germans to learn to live with less. In France, President Nicolas Sarkozy—who once came to power exhorting the French to work harder and earn more—has thrown his weight behind an expert report that declares the pursuit of GDP growth a "fetish" and strives to replace the GDP statistic with a broader measure of national contentment.
Few would argue the world can just go back to the old go-go economy, where a large part of what was taken as growth was financed by unsustainable bubbles in credit and asset prices. The 2008 spike in the cost of food and oil reminded us that the present rate of resource depletion can't go on forever. And the debate over whether GDP statistics are really the proper measure of human progress is perfectly valid—and not new. Economists are the first to admit that GDP is at best a proxy for prosperity, not an end in itself.
Yet today's no-growthers seem to make the same mistakes as their many predecessors, from Thomas Malthus—who predicted in 1798 that rising populations would inevitably starve—to the Club of Rome, a group of scientists who warned in 1972 that the world would start running out of key resources in the 1980s. Such movements extrapolate growth rates for resource use and pollution but don't take enough account of technical innovation, environmental regulation, greater efficiency, and behavioral change. Take Exit author Meinhard Miegel's claim that the world is running out of food. It largely ignores, among other things, the barely tapped potential of genetic engineering and other plant-breeding technologies.
Such faults are often overlooked because the no-growthers resonate in Europe today for intellectual and political reasons, not economic or technological ones. Critiques of growth have always been, at their core, about uneasiness with capitalism itself. That this critique becomes mainstream when capitalism seems to be failing us is no surprise. After all, the Club of Rome made its first splash in the 1970s, during a long slowdown when people were also becoming newly aware of environmental degradation.
It's also no surprise that the movement is now centered in Europe and led by a French president. In no other country on earth is public disapproval of the market economy, as measured by opinion polls, deeper. French children, in a widely used and by no means exceptional schoolbook, learn that "economic growth imposes a hectic form of life that produces overwork, stress, nervous depression, cardiovascular disease, and cancer." To the 2.6 billion people worldwide trying to stay alive on less than $2 a day, the idea that economic growth causes stress may sound crazy. But in Europe, even conservatives have widely bought into the Marxist idea of "economism"—the notion that capitalism has reduced our lives to a series of market transactions.
There's something to these critiques. But the no-growthers are unrealistic about how painful a no-growth reality would be. As the Harvard scholar Benjamin Friedman argues eloquently in The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth, a society that gives up on growth invites nasty fights over the distribution of limited resources and paves the way for intolerance and populism. That economic growth isn't everything—it doesn't measure the value of our relationships, our communities, our culture—is obvious. But so is the correlation between prosperity and quality of life, including health, longevity, and the freedom to pursue happiness. Even if the critics are right and growth is going to be harder to attain post-crisis, that's no reason to give up on it. Just the opposite: all the more reason to spend our energy coming up with the right policies—from education and innovation to entrepreneurship and competition—that will help foster it.

Avatar du membre
Gis
Messages : 4939
Enregistré le : 13 oct. 2008, 00:00:00
Localisation : Loire-Atlantique

Message non lu par Gis » 02 avr. 2010, 08:09:00

Salut Libéral - je rajoute juste le lien ici pour la traduction.
 

Libéral

Message non lu par Libéral » 02 avr. 2010, 08:13:00

Merci pour le lien, mais des fois certains se plaignent de la qualité des traductions Googlienne. :oops:

Avatar du membre
El Fredo
Messages : 26120
Enregistré le : 17 févr. 2010, 00:00:00
Parti Politique : En Marche (EM)
Localisation : Roazhon
Contact :

Message non lu par El Fredo » 02 avr. 2010, 09:40:00

Bon, l'article est intéressant (merci Libéral) mais le propos est souvent discutable :
Take Exit author Meinhard Miegel's claim that the world is running out of food. It largely ignores, among other things, the barely tapped potential of genetic engineering and other plant-breeding technologies.
Franchement, baser l'espoir de nourrir une population sans cesse croissante sur la foi d'un fantasme comme les OGM tient de la pensée magique. Surtout quand on suit un peu les actualités scientifiques qui indiquent qu'à terme ceux-ci ne procurent pas de rendements supérieurs à l'agriculture classique et de plus génèrent des effets de bords franchement inquiétants (l'apparition de ravageurs super-résistants par exemple). Tout ça ne change pas le fait que les ressources agricoles et biologiques ne sont pas infinies.

L'impression qui s'en dégage est une certaine foi quasi mystique dans le progrès technologique pour résoudre nos problèmes, ce que je trouve inquiétant dans la mesure où elle nous dissuade de réfléchir à des solutions alternatives. A contrario les "décroissants" n'ont pas tort sur l'absurdité du PIB comme indicateur économique dominant.

D'ailleurs Malthus avait raison : http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0 ... was-right/

A partir de là on doit se poser la question : est-ce que l'hypothèse malthusienne reste valable et l'ère de croissance moderne est-elle exceptionnelle et vouée à s'interrompre ? Rappelons que celle-ci n'a été rendue possible que par l'abondance d'énergie bon marché et l'exploitation effrénée des ressources naturelles. S'il est théoriquement possible d'acquérir des sources d'énergies illimitées à notre échelle (énergies renouvelables voire fusion nucléaire), on ne pourra pas s'affranchir de la finitude des autres ressources. Donc pour assurer un avenir à l'humanité à ce rythme, il faudra que notre consommation de ressources diminue tout en maintenant notre niveau de vie une fois atteint un optimum. C'est théoriquement possible mais connaissant la nature humaine je doute que ça soit l'hypothèse la plus probable.
If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One— I am become Death, the shatterer of Worlds.

Libéral

Message non lu par Libéral » 02 avr. 2010, 11:26:00

El Fredo a écrit :Bon, l'article est intéressant (merci Libéral) mais le propos est souvent discutable :
Take Exit author Meinhard Miegel's claim that the world is running out of food. It largely ignores, among other things, the barely tapped potential of genetic engineering and other plant-breeding technologies.
Franchement, baser l'espoir de nourrir une population sans cesse croissante sur la foi d'un fantasme comme les OGM tient de la pensée magique. Surtout quand on suit un peu les actualités scientifiques qui indiquent qu'à terme ceux-ci ne procurent pas de rendements supérieurs à l'agriculture classique et de plus génèrent des effets de bords franchement inquiétants (l'apparition de ravageurs super-résistants par exemple). Tout ça ne change pas le fait que les ressources agricoles et biologiques ne sont pas infinies.

L'impression qui s'en dégage est une certaine foi quasi mystique dans le progrès technologique pour résoudre nos problèmes, ce que je trouve inquiétant dans la mesure où elle nous dissuade de réfléchir à des solutions alternatives. A contrario les "décroissants" n'ont pas tort sur l'absurdité du PIB comme indicateur économique dominant.

D'ailleurs Malthus avait raison : http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/0 ... was-right/

A partir de là on doit se poser la question : est-ce que l'hypothèse malthusienne reste valable et l'ère de croissance moderne est-elle exceptionnelle et vouée à s'interrompre ? Rappelons que celle-ci n'a été rendue possible que par l'abondance d'énergie bon marché et l'exploitation effrénée des ressources naturelles. S'il est théoriquement possible d'acquérir des sources d'énergies illimitées à notre échelle (énergies renouvelables voire fusion nucléaire), on ne pourra pas s'affranchir de la finitude des autres ressources. Donc pour assurer un avenir à l'humanité à ce rythme, il faudra que notre consommation de ressources diminue tout en maintenant notre niveau de vie une fois atteint un optimum. C'est théoriquement possible mais connaissant la nature humaine je doute que ça soit l'hypothèse la plus probable.
Tu as tout dit avec "Malthus avait raison". Tu crois en Malthus, je n'y crois point du tout. Le génie de l'homme est sans limite visible ... icon_evil

Avatar du membre
El Fredo
Messages : 26120
Enregistré le : 17 févr. 2010, 00:00:00
Parti Politique : En Marche (EM)
Localisation : Roazhon
Contact :

Message non lu par El Fredo » 02 avr. 2010, 18:14:00

Libéral a écrit :Tu as tout dit avec "Malthus avait raison". Tu crois en Malthus, je n'y crois point du tout. Le génie de l'homme est sans limite visible ... icon_evil
Tu n'as pas lu l'article lié ?
If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One— I am become Death, the shatterer of Worlds.

Libéral

Message non lu par Libéral » 03 avr. 2010, 04:09:00

El Fredo a écrit :
Libéral a écrit :Tu as tout dit avec "Malthus avait raison". Tu crois en Malthus, je n'y crois point du tout. Le génie de l'homme est sans limite visible ... icon_evil
Tu n'as pas lu l'article lié ?
Je l'ai lu et celà ne m'a guère rendu plus savant.

Avatar du membre
El Fredo
Messages : 26120
Enregistré le : 17 févr. 2010, 00:00:00
Parti Politique : En Marche (EM)
Localisation : Roazhon
Contact :

Message non lu par El Fredo » 03 avr. 2010, 11:12:00

Et bien, pour résumer, il n'y a pas à "croire" en Malthus, puisque comme le montre l'article il avait raison, vu que ses observations se sont vérifiées tout au long de l'histoire de l'Humanité, jusqu'à la révolution industrielle.
The fact is that Malthus was right about the whole of human history up until his own era.
(Le fait est que Malthus avait raison concernant toute l'histoire de l'humanité jusqu'à son époque)

Sumerian peasants in the 30th century BC lived on the edge of subsistence; so did French peasants in the 18th century AD. Throughout history population growth had always managed to cancel out any sustained gains in the standard of living, just as Malthus said.
(Les paysans Sumériens du 30e siècle av. JC vivait à la limite de la subsistance; de même que les paysans français du 18e siècle ap. JC. Tout au long de l'histoire, la croissance démographique a toujours annulé tout gain continu de niveau de vie, comme l'avait dit Malthus.)

It was only with the industrial revolution that we finally escaped from the trap (if we did — for all we know, 35th-century historians will view the period 1800-2020 or so as a temporary aberration).
(Ce fut seulement avec la révolution industrielle que nous pûmes nous sortir de ce piège (si jamais nous le fîtes - après tout, les historiens du 35e siècle verront peut-être la période 1800-2020 comme une aberration temporaire)
La question est donc de savoir si les conditions qui prévalent depuis cette révolution industrielle sont exceptionnelles ou pérennes. Les adeptes de la non-croissance (à ne pas confondre avec la décroissance) penchent pour la première hypothèse. Ce sont plutôt les autres qui "croient" en la perpétuation de ces conditions, alimentées par les progrès technologiques générateurs de croissance. Pour pouvoir départager les deux il faudrait prévoir l'avenir, mais on doit bien admettre que l'hypothèse de l'épuisement des ressources non renouvelables est la plus probable, d'autant plus qu'on commence à l'observer en conditions réelles. Or une fois celles-ci épuisées, ne restera que les ressources renouvelables qui à elles seules ne peuvent qu'assurer un niveau de richesse stable (et donc une croissance nulle à un niveau optimal). Et si dans le même temps la population continue à croitre, cela signifie tout simplement que la richesse par individu diminue.

Donc une fois la richesse mondiale stabilisé à un niveau optimum, l'hypothèse malthusienne redevient valable.
If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One— I am become Death, the shatterer of Worlds.

Libéral

Message non lu par Libéral » 03 avr. 2010, 12:24:00

Merci d'avoir expliqué. Je suis tenant de la seconde voie c'est clair. Les ressources sont limitées mais moins qu'on ne le dit d'une part, et on apprendra à recycler (métaux) ou à substituer. D'autre part, la science et la technologie n'en sont qu'à la péhistoire. Les progrès fait en électronique et informatique en 30 ans sont stupéfiants par exemple, on pourrait aussi parler de chirurgie, d'aéronautique, de biotechnologies, de construction automobile ou de traitement des déchets. J'en pense donc que l'économie mondiale doit croitre et que le génie humain trouvera des solutions.

Avatar du membre
El Fredo
Messages : 26120
Enregistré le : 17 févr. 2010, 00:00:00
Parti Politique : En Marche (EM)
Localisation : Roazhon
Contact :

Message non lu par El Fredo » 04 avr. 2010, 22:07:00

Je le pense aussi, mais à l'échelle de quelques siècles, voire quelques décennies pour les plus pessimistes. En revanche, sur le long terme à l'échelle de l'Humanité (plusieurs dizaines de millénaires et au-delà), je suis beaucoup plus pessimiste. En effet pour assurer une croissance positive pendant une période illimitée avec des ressources limitées et une population tendant vers un maximum, cela implique que la consommation de ressources diminue à richesse égale grâce aux progrès technologiques, tandis que la croissance tend asymptotiquement vers zéro. Donc pour moi ça reste une possibilité théorique mais qui a peu de chance de se verifier : si on part de l'hypothèse que l'Humanité aura réussi à établir un modèle de société stable et égalitaire (façon Star Trek), on pourra s'en sortir avec une croissance nulle (énergies renouvelables inépuisables et recyclage à 100% des ressources déjà extraites), mais connaissant la nature humaine je pense qu'on se sera entre-tués avant. Et quoi qu'il arrive plus le temps passe plus l'hypothèse malthusienne redevient valide : une fois atteint l'optimum, toute augmentation de population aboutit nécessairement à un appauvrissement.

Seule possibilité : explorer de nouveaux mondes, ce qui augmente les ressources disponibles. Mais l'hypothèse no-growth se limite à notre seule planète, car la possibilité de colonisation à grande échelle d'autres planètes est extrêmement faible vu la quantité de ressources nécessaire. Et pour que l'hypothèse no-growth ne se vérifie jamais, il faudrait que l'humanité disparaisse avant qu'elle ait épuisé toutes les ressources, ce qui est plus ou moins déprimant selon l'échéance. 100 ans ? 1000 ans ? 10.000 ans (durée de la période historique depuis l'invention de l'écriture) ? 1 million d'années (apparition de l'Homo Erectus) ? A titre personnel, je considérerais toute échéance inférieure à 10.000 ans comme un échec.
If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the Mighty One— I am become Death, the shatterer of Worlds.

Répondre

Retourner vers « Actualité étrangère et européenne »

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur enregistré